A "Wee Stroll" Through the Province of Buckinghamshire in aid of the British Heart Foundation and Brain Cancer Trust

The next big Buckinghamshire Craft and Royal Arch joint charitable event is here.

On Friday 26th July, through to Sunday 28th July, a group of intrepid walkers will be joining the Worshipful Master of Stephens Lodge, on a journey through the province, starting at Bletchley Masonic Centre and finishing at Slough over three days.

David Clark, Steve Pratt and Andrew Murray have undertaken this challenging task and have committed to walking the full length of 68 miles and they need your help.

They are looking for enthusiastic ramblers to join them, just for part, or even the whole length, this will be a gruelling 22 miles each day totalling 68 miles, which is two and a half marathons! There will be many stops along the way for refreshments and break stops detailed in a schedule below. We would appreciate any support on the day, whether you are rambling or could assist our support team along the way.

A member of the lodge suffered a heart attack in April, inspiring the team to take positive action by supporting the British Heart Foundation, as well as supporting the Brain Cancer Trust. We are hoping to raise £5000 in aid of these great causes.

Day 1 - Bletchley to Aylesbury Masonic Centre - (22.8 Miles)
Stops include- The Three Locks pub, Toot Toot canal parking, Gables Masonic Hall, Cook's Wharf car park, The Red Lion, finishing at Aylesbury Centre.

Day 2 - Aylesbury to Beaconsfield Masonic Centre - (22.8 Miles)
Stops include- The Five Bells Pub, Boug's Meadow Great Missenden, The Old Oak Holmer Green, Penn Street Village Hall, Winchmore Hill Village Hall, Beaconsfield Masonic Centre.

Day 3 - Beaconsfield to Slough Masonic Centre - (22.1 Miles)
Stops include- The Royal Standard, Marlow Masonic Centre, Jenners Riverside Cafe, Slough Masonic Centre (The Finish Line).

The all-Important Link is as below.
https://donate.givetap.co.uk/f/masonic-charitable-foundation/l3089-stephens-lodge/a-wee-stroll-through-the-province 

Buckinghamshire Freemasons BIG 123 Event: A Historic Day at Freemasons' Hall

Buckinghamshire Freemasons have once more made Masonic history. Saturday, June 29th, 2024, saw a once-in-a-lifetime occasion where Buckinghamshire Freemasonry took over the entire Freemasons' Hall on Great Queen Street for a day filled with ceremony, tradition, and progression. 

A Day of Degrees and Special Moments

The essence of the BIG 123 event lay in its unique approach to our cherished rituals. We conducted First, Second, and Third Degree ceremonies simultaneously across every temple within Freemasons' Hall. This ambitious undertaking was a testament to our commitment to the craft and an unprecedented opportunity to welcome new brothers and elevate our brethren along their Masonic journeys. 

A truly special moment occurred during the event when the newly appointed Assistant Provincial Grand Master Tim Anders initiated his father into Freemasonry in the Grand Temple. This poignant ceremony added a deeply personal touch to an already historic day, highlighting the intergenerational bonds that Freemasonry fosters. It was a powerful reminder of how our fraternity spans not just years, but lifetimes and generations, binding families in shared values and traditions.

Honouring Tradition and Embracing the Future

Freemasonry is built on a foundation of history and tradition, and the grandeur of Freemasons' Hall, with its rich architectural heritage, served as the perfect backdrop for such an event. This historic building has witnessed countless ceremonies and has been a cornerstone of Masonic activity for over three centuries. Our gathering there on Saturday was a nod to the enduring values and principles that have guided Freemasons through the ages.

Yet, as we honoured our past, we were equally focused on the future.

The BIG 123 event was designed to invigorate our ranks with new brothers who share our commitment to personal development, charity, and brotherhood. By facilitating multiple degree ceremonies, we accelerated the Masonic progression for many, ensuring that our fraternity remains vibrant and dynamic.

Growing Our Brotherhood

Freemasonry has always been about growth—both personal and communal. The BIG 123 event was a strategic effort to bolster our numbers and fortify our bonds. In an age where digital interactions often overshadow face-to-face connections, Freemasonry offers a unique space for meaningful engagement and lifelong friendships. Our ceremonies yesterday not only initiated new brothers but also reinforced the shared values that make our brotherhood strong.

The event saw over 650 Freemasons, and guests from 47 different lodges across the Buckinghamshire province in attendance. 150 Freemasons were initiated as Entered Apprentices, Fellowcrafts, and Master Masons throughout the day. It was an experience that will live in the memories of all who attended.



Music by Take That performing Greatest Day. (C) 2008 Polydor Ltd. (UK)

DID YOU KNOW HE WAS A FREEMASON ?

GEORGE WASHINGTON

George Washington was an American military officer, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797.

Washington joined Freemasonry in the Lodge at Fredericksburg, Virginia at 20 years old, November 4, 1752.

The lodge’s surviving minute book records Washington attending only 4 meetings after he joined: 3rd March 1753, 4th August 1753, 1st September 1753, and 4th January 1755.

Washington’s “Mother Lodge” was renamed and numbered as Fredericksburg Lodge No. 4 after the creation of the Grand Lodge of Virginia in 1778. It continues to meet today.
In 1794, Alexandria Lodge No. 39, of which Washington was an honorary member, commissioned William Williams to paint Washington dressed in Masonic regalia. After Washington’s death the lodge changed its name to Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22.
Interesting fact:

Although President Washington oversaw the construction of the White House, he never lived in it. It was not until 1800, when the White House was nearly completed, that its first resident, President John Adams moved in.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has has hand and still has so many famous members, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join?

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AND THAT’S A WRAP !

Yesterday Buckinghamshire Freemasons made Masonic history … AGAIN.

All 3 ceremonies carried out at Freemasons Hall, London using every temple by 47 Lodges.

A truly BIG event !

We look forward to sharing images from the day in the coming week.

AND THAT’S A WRAP !

Yesterday Buckinghamshire Freemasons made Masonic history … AGAIN.

All 3 ceremonies carried out at Freemasons Hall, London using every temple by 47 Lodges.

A truly BIG event !

We look forward to sharing images from the day in the coming week.

TOMORROW'S THE BIG 1-2-3 DAY

Buckinghamshire Freemasons making masonic history yet again !

The whole of Freemason Hall , Freemasonry's national home in Central London, occupied by Buckinghamshire Freemason Lodges carrying out private ceremonies in all the temples throughout the day.

This event marks a historic milestone for Buckinghamshire Freemasonry and promises a memorable day for all.

584 attending
47 Different Lodges

https://youtu.be/PjRL8kjNKeA

FREEMASONRY IN THE COMMUNITY

Saturday night through to the early hours of Sunday morning saw Buckinghamshire Freemasons step forward to marshal the local Florence Nightingale Charity Hospice  Midnight Walk.

Over 400 walkers took to the streets of Aylesbury to either complete a 5 or 10 mile route while raising money for the charity.  To guide the routes through the night, over 40 Freemasons from 20 different lodges of Buckinghamshire stood at points to cheer the walkers on and ensure their safety.

The Midnight walk was first established with the Hospice in 2010, with the exception of the CoViD lock down years, and has raised over £1million pounds from its start, it is the largest fundraising event that they carry out each year.

Buckinghamshire Freemasons have proudly put themselves forward to be involved since its inception, a true Freemasonry In The Community event.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has has hand and still has so many famous members, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch. 

JULY DIARY OF MEETINGS

Buckinghamshire has 117 lodges that meet at 16 Centres across the county throughout the year.

This is the diary for the coming month.

If there is a location & day that suits your home and work life and you are interested in finding out more, please reach out to our membership team who will be more than happy to answer any questions you may have.

If you would like to be part of freemasonry and a global community, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch. 

DID YOU KNOW HE WAS A FREEMASON !

Sergeant Major Johnson Gideon Beharry, VC, COG.

Sergeant Johnson Beharry joined the British Army at the age of 21. While serving with the 1st Battalion in Iraq, Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, Johnson's armoured Warrior vehicle fell into a trap and his colleagues were significantly injured. He drove under the enemy fire and saved their lives.

After that incident, he was soon caught in another trap, which caused severe head injuries to him and his crew. In a display of extreme courage, he drove out of the ambush before losing consciousness. While still recovering from brain surgery, Sergeant Beharry was awarded the Victoria Cross.

He is involved in charities and he is the founder of JBVC Foundation, which helps young people involved in gang culture rebuild their lives and future. 
Sergeant Beharry is a member of Queensman Lodge No. 2694 in London.
Awards and campaign medals.

Victoria Cross - For valour in Iraq.
Kosovo Medal - For service in Kosovo.
Iraq Medal - For service in Iraq.
Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal - Presented to all living VC and GC recipients on 29 May 2012.
Queen Elizabeth II Platinum Jubilee Medal - Presented to all living VC and GC recipients on 6 February 2022.
Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) - For 15 years regular army service, 4 October 2016.
Companion of the Order of Grenada.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has has hand and still has so many famous members, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join?

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Bucks Classic Car Lodge Installs a First Time Master

W.Bro Mike Pearsall was installed into the chair at Bucks Classic Car Lodge on Saturday 15th June at Beaconsfield Masonic Centre.

Since it’s consecration in 2017 when the Primus master R.W Bro Sir Stuart Hampson took the controls for the first year and then subsequent years the chair has been occupied by past Masters.

Assistant Provincial Grand Master Matthew Perkins attended with a host of Provincial officers, along with some newly appointed Grand Officers, W.Bro’s Eraldo Guarino and Carl Freeman.

W.Bro Matt was presented with his BCCL driving licence and obligatory L Plates, in the theme of the lodge's special interest, classic cars.

Some 40 members then dined together at a magnificent festive board which was topped off with a fantastic rendition of the Masters Song by W.Bro Phil (Elvis) Witney.

We now look forward to initiating two new members at BIG123 on Saturday 29th June.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch.  

Fun Day at Slough Masonic Centre

Slough Daylight, The Shooting Lodge, along with Observatory Lodge, held a joint BBQ and Laser Clay Shooting Fun Day at the Slough Masonic Centre.

Over 70 Freemasons, their partners, friends and family were in attendance for the first BBQ to be held at the centre.

After a short Lodge meeting in the moring, the guests arrived for the Laser Clay Shooting held on the adjacent school playing field.

After building up a healthy appetite, a fantastic BBQ followed, utilising the new terrace area of the recently improved Slough Masonic Centre.

This was a highly enjoyable way to spend a sunny Saturday with friends and family and is typical of the many fun social events organised by Lodges throughout the Buckinghamshire Province.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
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D-DAY - 80th Anniversary

Today, we remember the sacrifices of those who stormed the beaches of Normandy 80 years ago.

“They gave their todays, for our tomorrows”

In Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s speech to Parliament on 4th June 1940, he famously said “We shall fight on the beaches” little did he know then that 4 years later, that’s exactly what we would be doing. 

Lest We Forget
https://winstonchurchill.org/.../we-shall-fight-on-the.../

Operation Overlord was the code-name for the Allied invasion of North-West Europe. The assault phase of Operation Overlord was known as Operation Neptune.

Codenamed Operation Neptune and often referred to as D-Day, it is the largest seaborne invasion in history and was undoubtedly a turning point in the Second World War. The operation began the liberation of France, and the rest of Western Europe, and laid the foundations of the Allied victory on the Western Front.

The operation was launched on 6 June 1944 with the Normandy Landings (D-Day). A 1,200-plane airborne assault preceded an amphibious assault involving more than 5,000 vessels. Nearly 160,000 troops crossed the English Channel on 6 June, and more than two million Allied troops were in France by the end of August.

The Normandy beaches were chosen by planners because they lay within range of air cover, and were less heavily defended than the obvious objective of the Pas de Calais, the shortest distance between Great Britain and the Continent. 
Airborne drops at both ends of the beachheads were to protect the flanks, as well as open up roadways to the interior. 

Six divisions were to land on the first day; three U.S., two British and one Canadian. Two more British and one U.S. division were to follow up after the assault division had cleared the way through the beach defences. Disorganisation, confusion, incomplete or faulty implementation of plans characterised the initial phases of the landings. This was especially true of the airborne landings which were badly scattered, as well as the first wave units landing on the assault beaches. To their great credit, most of the troops were able to adapt to the disorganisation. In the end, the Allies achieved their objective.

Airborne Assault

The airborne assault into Normandy, as part of the D-Day allied invasion of Europe, was the largest use of airborne troops up to that time. Paratroopers of the U.S. 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, the British 6th Airborne Division, the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, and other attached Allied units took part in the assault. Numbering more than 13,000 men, the paratroopers were flown from bases in southern England to the Cotentin Peninsula in approximately 925 C-47 airplanes. An additional 4,000 men, consisting of glider infantry with supporting weapons, medical, and signal units were to arrive in 500 gliders later on D-Day to reinforce the paratroopers.

First to Make Land

The parachute troops were assigned what was probably the most difficult task of the initial operation - a night jump behind enemy lines five hours before the coastal landings.
Part of the 2nd Battalion (52nd), Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry) was among the first Allied troops to arrive in Normandy. They landed in six gliders in the early hours of June 6, 1944, near the River Orne and Caen Canal bridges. Their mission was to capture and hold these bridges, which were crucial for preventing German reinforcements from reaching the invasion beaches. This operation was led by Major John Howard and was a significant early success on D-Day, with the capture of Pegasus Bridge being particularly notable.

To protect the invasion zone's western extremity and to facilitate the "Utah" landing force's movement into the Cotentin Peninsula, the U.S. 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions descended on the peninsula by parachute and glider in the early hours of D-Day. The paratroopers were badly scattered. Many were injured and killed during the attack, and much of their equipment was lost, but the brave paratroopers fought fiercely, causing confusion among the German commanders and keeping the German’s troops occupied. Their efforts; hampered by harsh weather, darkness and disorganisation, and initiative of resourceful Soldiers and leaders, ensured that the Utah Beach assault objectives were eventually accomplished. The British and Canadian attacks also accomplished their primary goal of securing the left flank of the invasion force.

UTAH BEACH
Utah Beach was added to the initial invasion plan, almost as an afterthought. The allies needed a major port as soon as possible, and Utah Beach would put the U.S. VII Corps within 60 kilometres of Cherbourg at the outset. The major obstacles in this sector were not so much the beach defences, but the flooded and rough terrain that blocked the way north.

OMAHA BEACH
Omaha Beach linked the U.S. and British beaches. It was a critical link between the Cotentin Peninsula, also known as the Cherbourg Peninsula, and the flat plain in front of Caen. Omaha was also the most restricted and heavily defended beach. For that reason, at least one veteran U.S. Division (lst Infantry Division) was tasked to land there. The terrain was difficult. Omaha beach was unlike any of the other assault beaches in Normandy. Its crescent curve and unusual assortment of bluffs, cliffs and draws were immediately recognizable from the sea. It was the most defensible beach chosen for D-Day; in fact, many planners did not believe it a likely place for a major landing. The high ground commanded all approaches to the beach from the sea and tidal flats. Moreover, any advance made by U.S. troops from the beach would be limited to narrow passages between the bluffs. Advances directly up the steep bluffs were difficult in the extreme.
German strong points were arranged to command all the approaches and pillboxes were cited in the draws to fire east and west, thereby enfilading troops while remaining concealed from bombarding warships. These pillboxes had to be taken out by direct assault. Compounding this problem was the allied intelligence failure to identify a nearly full-strength infantry division, the 352nd, directly behind the beach. It was believed to be no further forward than St. Lo and Caumont, 20 miles inland. The V Corps was assigned to this sector. The objective was to obtain a lodgment area between Port-en-Bessin and the Vire River and ultimately push forward to St. Lo and Caumont in order to cut German communications (St. Lo was a major road junction). Allocated to the task were 1st and 29th Divisions, supported by the 5th Ranger Battalion and 5th Engineer Special Brigade.

GOLD BEACH
Gold Beach was the objective of the 50th Division (Northumbrian) of the British 2nd Army. Its primary task was to seize Arrolnanches (future site of a Mulberry) and drive inland to seize the road junction at Bayeux, as well as contact U.S. forces on their right and Canadians on their left. The initial opposition was fierce, but the British invasion forces broke through with relatively light casualties and were able to reach their objectives in this sector. A major factor in their success was that the British assault forces were lavishly equipped with armour and "Funnies" of the 79th Armoured Division. The "Funnies" were the specialist vehicles, armed with 290 mm mortars, and designed for tasks such as clearing obstacles or minefields and destruction of large fixed fortifications. Perhaps the most famous is the "Flail" tank, which was Sherman equipped with a large roller to which lengths of chains was attached. These tanks were designed to clear terrain to their front, and detonate mine fields and other booby traps without danger to the tanks or infantry following.

JUNO BEACH
Juno Beach was the landing area for the 3rd Canadian Division. The Canadians were very concerned about their role in the invasion (as was most of the planning staff) as the memory of 2nd Canadian Division's destruction at Dieppe was still fresh. But many lessons had been learned, and the 3rd Canadian Division, in spite of heavy opposition at Courseulles-sur-Mer, broke through and advanced nearly to their objective, the airfield at Carpiquet, west of Caen. The Canadians made the deepest penetration of any land forces on June 6th, again with moderate casualties.

SWORD BEACH
Sword Beach was the objective of the British 3rd Infantry Division. They were to advance inland as far as Caen, and line up with British Airborne forces east of the Orne River/Caen Canal. The Orne River bridges had been seized late at night, June 5, by a glider-borne reinforced company commanded by Maj. John Howard. As at the other beaches, British forces penetrated quite a ways inland after breaking the opposition at water's edge. Unfortunately, the objective of Caen was probably asking too much of a single infantry division, especially given the traffic jams and resistance encountered further inland. The 1st Special Service (Commando) Brigade commanded by Lord Lovat, linked up in the morning with Howard's force at Pegasus Bridge on the British left. Fierce opposition from the 21st Panzer and later the 12th SS Panzer division prevented the British from reaching Caen on the 6th. Indeed, Caen was not taken until late June.

Wikipedia Link for more in-depth information:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings

DID YOU KNOW HE WAS A FREEMASON ?

WINSTON CHURCHILL

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was a British politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955.
Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century,

Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer and an artist. Since its inception in 1901, Churchill is the only British Prime Minister to have won the Nobel Prize in Literature and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States.

Churchill was initiated into Studholme Lodge No. 1591 (now United Studholme Alliance Lodge) on 24 May 1901.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has has hand and still has so many famous members, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join?

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ORION "THE WINE" LODGE INSTALL ITS NEW MASTER

As Buckinghamshire's Fine Wine Lodge it was fantastic to see the progress this small but perfectly formed Lodge is making, did we mention its also one of our special interest "Wine" themed lodge?

The evening began with the Installation of W.Bro Philip Witney as WM by W.Bro Roger Chandler. The lodge practices "Logic" workings which were developed in the 1880s by members of the theatrical and performing arts in London. Ceremonies are "performed" and delivered to a high standard in Logic lodges. 

The lodge displayed an array of excellent newer masons doing work, in Fellowcrafts Nii Okyne and Michael Lee. 

What followed was an Italian themed festive board which paired excellent wines with each course of olives, bread, antipasti, spaghetti and cheese. Each wine was shared and explained by Lodge Sommelier Bro Lee Lee Keeper. 

This was a truly excellent evening and a unique experience in Buckinghamshire Freemasonry.

If you would like to be part of a global community, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
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BIG 1-2-3 - ONE MONTH TO GO

Join us for this incredible once in a lifetime experience where we take over Freemasons Hall for an entire day.

We will be holding 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree ceremonies in every temple at Great Queen Street to bring even more interested candidates into masonry and progressing our many newer members along their masonic careers.

There is only one month to go until BIG 1-2-3 if you have not booked in please do so through this below:
https://buckspgl.org/events/provincial-events/big123

If you would like to be part of a global community that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch. 

CONRAD WALKS THE HIGHLAND WAY TO SUPPORT BUDS

Conrad Evans an Aylesbury Freemason from Pegasus Lodge No 5637, walked the West Highland way in Scotland, a distance of 96 miles in 10 days, which is especially hard as Conrad is Disabled meaning that walking is far harder, making this an incredible feat.

Conrad did this in aid of a Charity called BUDS The Buckinghamshire Disability Service, who are focused on supporting disabled people by fixing the biggest issues facing them, click here to find our more about them: https://buds.org.uk/ 

At the finish line Conrad had raised a massive £3735 and we would like to assist him in reaching his target of £4000 for this brilliant cause.

Well done Conrad you have done us all very proud and made a big difference in supporting BUDS.

Please click the below link to support him:
https://shorturl.at/FmSBW

If you would like to be part of a global community that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch. 

 

JUNE DIARY OF MEETINGS

Buckinghamshire has 117 lodges that meet at 16 Centres across the county throughout the year.

This is the diary for the coming month.

If there is a location & day that suits your home and work life and you are interested in finding out more, please reach out to our membership team who will be more than happy to answer any questions you may have.

If you would like to be part of freemasonry and a global community, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch. 

DID YOU KNOW HE WAS A FREEMASON ?

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

The 26th president of America, a Harvard-educated scholar, a North Dakota cattle rancher, a politician and civil servant on the state and national level, leader of the famed “Rough Riders” in the Spanish-American War, Governor of New York, noted conservationist who advocated the creation of the National Park System, Nobel Peace Prize winner, an adventurer who always sought new challenges and, of course, President of the United States.

He joined Freemasonry at the age of forty-two in 1901, the year he began his service as President of the United States. He was initiated into Matinecock Lodge No. 806 of Oyster Bay, New York, and spent many years as an active and proud Freemason. Notably, Brother Roosevelt visited lodges in Africa, Europe, and South America and assisted in laying the cornerstone of the Pilgrim Memorial Monument in Provincetown, MA.  He broke ground for a Masonic Temple in Spokane, Washington in 1903 and attended the Masonic cornerstone laying of the House of Representatives building in 1906.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has has hand and still has so many famous members, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join?

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DISCOVERING FREEMASONRY

Buckinghamshire Freemasons hold another highly successful membership event.

Freemasons from Buckinghamshire hosted yet another remarkable live event, inviting a large number of candidates who were interested in Freemasonry to attend an evening where they had the opportunity to learn about Freemasonry from masons who had a great deal of experience.

In addition, it was available to partners and visitors, as well as anybody who had a passing interest in the topic and was eager to learn more about it. In order to accommodate their visitors, the Slough Masonic Centre was filled with a large number of people, including already existing Freemasons to accompany their guests.

At the beginning of the evening, Neil Robertson provided a brief introduction to the concept of freemasonry and discussed the unique aspects that make it so remarkable. 
Lee Buckingham, John Palman, and Matt Eaton were among the other individuals that spoke in more detail about who we are and what we do. 

The conference came to a close with a presentation on the philanthropic contributions that Freemasonry has made, as well as a special presentation from Dawn Allen of the Henry Allen Trust, which is an organisation that we have recently supported.  

The evening was a fantastic success, bringing in a number of candidates we will be welcoming into Freemasonry at our BIG1-2-3 event at the end of June.

Thank you to everyone who assisted on the evening and those who supported with your attendance.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has its roots firmly planted in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling out the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch.

DID YOU KNOW HE WAS A FREEMASON ?

SIR ERNEST SHACKLETON

Explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton once famously said; "If you're a leader, a fellow that other fellows look to, you've got to keep going." He was born on 15 February 1874 in County Kildare, Ireland, but his family moved to London where Shackleton was educated.

Rejecting his father's wish that he become a doctor, he joined the merchant navy when he was 16 and qualified as a master mariner in 1898. He travelled widely, but was keen to explore the North and South poles. Shackleton visited the poles on three occasions and on the second occasion, Shackleton led his own expedition on the ship Nimrod. His team climbed Mount Erebus, made many important scientific discoveries and set a record by reaching closer to the South Pole than achieved before. On his return to Britain, Shackleton was knighted.

Shackleton's fourth expedition aimed to circumnavigate the Antarctic continent, but on 5 January 1922, he died after suffering a heart attack just off the coast of South Georgia.

Shackleton was initiated into Navy Lodge No. 2612 in London on 9 July 1901. 
He was elected an honorary member of the Lodge on 28 April 1914.

If you would like to be part of a global community that has has hand and still has so many famous members, that has its roots firmly in the ground in Buckinghamshire, please join us by following this link: https://buckspgl.org/join
After filling in the short form, our Membership Team will be in touch